You take the blue pill. The story ends; you believe whatever you want to believe.

You take the red pill – you stay in Wonderland and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes.

Ahh, the infamous rabbit hole. As musculoskeletal therapists, we have a few of them to explore; the body’s inter-organ relationships for example. The bonds among bones, muscles, deep fasciae, nerves and all other organs.


Although inter-organ relationships aren’t necessarily complex, they are many. No seriously, many many.


Everything connects with everything. It’s an intriguing but horribly confusing mess.

fibula-connections

There are more connections in the human body than there are stars in the galaxy. The fibula bone has more than 50 inter-organ relationships. This images shows ONLY 9.

Even though it is confusing this inter-organ-relationship-rabbit-hole is worth exploring.


Why? Well, inter-organ relationships make solving musculoskeletal pain and injury easier and more efficient.


Unfortunately, their vast numbers make them difficult to work with. I mean, where do we start? In addition, how do you use the relationships among muscles, deep fasciae, bones, and nerves for treating injuries anyway?


No worries, there’s no reason to fret. This is where we come in. We’ve done the tedious work for you.


We read hundreds of anatomy books and research papers and spent a lot of time figuring out which organs connect and how. We cut the clutter as well as we could. And designed an app to show the connections that are useful for solving pain and injuries.


We’ve turned thousands of confusing inter-organ relationships into something applicable, practical, and easy to use.


So, without further ado, as I’ve introduced it enough, I give you RedPill. The proprietary injury treatment helper. Ahem …, the step-by-step guide to solving all kinds of musculoskeletal complaints.

What is RedPill really? What does it do? How does it help you, help your patients?


Well, it shows you which muscles, deep fasciae, nerves, and other organs to evaluate and treat when addressing pain or an injury in a specific area. It compiles “evaluation and treatment suggestion lists”.


It shows, for example, which dermatomes, bones, ligaments, muscles, and nerves to evaluate when helping a patient with anterior shoulder pain. It tells you which deep fasciae, joint capsules, and muscles to examine when treating a patient suffering from lower back pain.


Sounds great, doesn’t it? It gets even better. RedPill also suggests an order in which to examine the organs. It ranks muscles, deep fasciae, and nerves from “crucial” for recovery to “important enough.” On top of that, RedPill shows the progress your patient makes from one therapy session to the next.


RedPill takes some of the guess work out of your physical evaluation and treatment. It provides clear structure and makes your work easier and more efficient.

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Using the app in your clinic is easy!


A patient enters your clinic with pain/injury in his groin area after playing basketball.


As you always do, you start by making sure modalities, manual, or massage therapy, and physical activity are not contra-indicated. We always ask a physician or specialist to OK manual therapy and physical activity if there is a trauma involved or if the complaint is chronic. Our patients’ well-being is, after all, paramount.


In response to your question, “Where does it hurt the most?” your patient points to the far inside of his groin.


Now this is important. Your patient has to help you understand where it hurts the most−, where the center of the pain is located. Since pain is a funny thing, you probably have to figure it out together. You can help by asking about movements that hurt and by examining, and probing the painful area with your fingers. Once you’ve established the center(s) of the pain, you do one of two things.


One: You use an easy-start with an image matching the pain location (more info see FAQ). In this case, an image of the “high groin” lit up.


Two: After consulting an atlas of anatomy with your patient, you decide that the pain is located over the proximal attachment of the “adductor longus” on (or close to) the “innominate”. You enter both organs (more info see FAQ). – – A note for all the anatomy buffs out there; you don’t have to use an atlas to fill out the 1st column. If you feel you’re knowledgable enough, you can do without. But there are benefits to using one. For example, we always use an atlas to inform our patients and get them actively involved. It’s up to you!


RedPill shows you a list with organs to evaluate and, if necessary, treat. Can’t get much easier, can it?


Although you can if you want to; there’s no need to make a diagnosis. Instead the location of the pain is our guiding star (for more info see “ABOUT”).

Now, how do you use a suggestion-list during a treatment?


Luckily, you don’t have to do anything special. Using RedPill does not require you to learn new evaluation, treatment, or exercise techniques. What you know and what you’re accustomed to will do just fine.

RedPill-process

RedPill uses an universal, easy to follow, step-by-step treatment process. You can use hands-on therapies, exercises and modalities.

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1. start

Begin every therapy session at the bottom of the 4th column (“Still important enough”). Yep, that’s right, every session. Just click on the “start treatment” button and you’re off to the races. Work your way up to the top of the 4th column. Do the same with the 3rd, 2nd, and finally the 1st column.


We can’t guarantee a fast recovery, but if you’re pressed for time, you can try skipping a column or two. Although every column contains important pieces of the puzzle, the organs in the first two columns are more directly involved in your patient’s complaint. They generally have a more profound impact on recovery.

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2. evaluate

Evaluate each organ as well as you can. Compare the test results with adjacent organs, the contra-lateral side, and the established norm.


Examine tonicity of skin, muscle, and deep fascia. Test pliability of deep fascia and muscle. Learn about the mobility of bone in relationship to other bones. Evaluate the length of nerves, muscles, and ligaments, the strength of muscles, and the ROM of jointed bones … I think you get the picture. Just use the evaluation techniques you’ve been taught.


FYI, the app contains illustrations and information to locate the organ in question and help you decide what to test and measure.


If all your tests are pain free and negative, if you can’t find anything wrong, select the thumbs-up button RedPill-thumbs-up-icon and move on to the next organ on your list (3. next).


If your patient feels pain during your evaluation, or if you find a dysfunction or other problem, you correct what needs correcting (4. treat).

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3. next

Move on to the next organ on your list and start from the beginning again (1. start).


If you worked your way through the whole list, if you examined and treated all the organs with time to spare, you start again at the bottom of the 4th column (“Still important enough”). This approach promotes precision and limits making mistakes.

If you find a dysfunction and/or the evaluation (2.) is painful or uncomfortable ….  

RedPill-treatment

4. treat

Correct what needs correcting; work your magic.


Lengthen short muscles. Alleviate painful deep fascia. Strengthen weak muscles. Mobilize entrapped nerves. Improve ROM between bones when limited. Increase pliability of stiff deep fascia. Alleviate sore muscles. And so on, and so forth.


It doesn’t matter what technique or which method you use to get the job done.


You can use ART, Trigger Point Therapy, Muscle Energy, Swedish massage, or any other manual therapy or massage technique. You can dry needle, use modalities, stretches, and exercises. It doesn’t matter. It’s up to you. Use whatever technique or method you feel is most effective.

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5. re-evaluate

Re-evaluate what you’re working on, what you’re trying to correct. Do it regularly and do it often. It is the only way to make sure your exercises and therapy are effective. Treat and re-evaluate.


If the re-evaluation is pain free and negative, if you can’t find anything wrong anymore, select the thumbs-up button RedPill-thumbs-up-icon and move on to the next organ on your list (6. next).


If your patient feels pain during the re-evaluation, if the dysfunction you initially found is not yet solved, or if you find another problem, try correcting it (7. treat again).

RedPill-Next-icon

6. next

Yes, you did it. Move on to the next organ on your list and start from the beginning again (1. start).


If you worked your way through the whole list, if you examined and treated all the organs with time to spare, you start again at the bottom of the 4th column (“Still important enough”). This approach promotes precision and limits making mistakes.

If you find a dysfunction and/or the re-evaluation (5.) is painful or uncomfortable ….

RedPill-treatment

7. treat again

If you’re addressing something other than what you found during step 2, do your thing. Improve the mobility of an immobile muscle, secure a consistent pliability of deep fascia …, you know the drill.


However, if the pain or dysfunction you found during step 2 is not yet solved, try changing your approach. Use a different technique or exercise, for example. Change the intensity or speed of what you do. Change joint angles or the position your patient sits or lies in. Try doing something (slightly) different.

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8. stop

It’s time to move on. We can’t keep working on an organ that does not respond the way we hope. Never spend more than five minutes per list item, even if your treatment doesn’t have the desired effect. The organ might be slow to respond. Also, addressing other organs on the list will have a positive effect. On top of that, you’ll get back to that stubborn organ again next session. So after five minutes, move on (9. next).


The app has a built-in timer to help you stay on track. It starts when you click the “start treatment” button and beeps when you have a minute left. It resets every time you select a thumbs-up, or thumbs-down icon.


Before moving on, don’t forget to select the thumbs-down button RedPill-thumbs-down-icon. This particular organ requires more attention and care during the next session or next “walk through”.

RedPill-Next-icon

9. next

Move onto the next organ on your list and start from the beginning again (1. start).


If you worked your way through the whole list, if you examined and treated all the organs with time to spare, you start again at the bottom of the 4th column. This approach promotes precision and limits the making of mistakes or forgetting something.


Oh yeah, don’t worry if you still have a ways to go at the end of your session. You’ll get to the other organs on the list next time or the session after the next one. You’ll see.

HOME

EXERCISES

When you’re done, at the end of your therapy session, give your patient a home exercise program.


For starters, create an endurance program, a program to help improve your patient’s cardiovascular capacity. Good endurance promotes recovery.


In addition, stretches, strength, coordination, and mobility exercises help reinforce and support your treatment sessions, promote proper function, and prevent loss of function.


Design the program based on what you found during your evaluations. The “thumbs-down-organs” are especially important; they need some extra care.

That’s it. As I said, it’s not different, really. RedPill makes suggestions on what to evaluate and in which order. And, you work your magic.

For all you early adopters, lock in a low introduction fee for years to come. Start your FREE 5 day trial now!

Since it’s a beta version, we still have work to do; RedPill is available for only $100 per year. If you’re not sure about how to use it, you can take it for a spin. Every subscription comes with a FREE 5-day trial. Your credit card is NOT charged if you cancel your subscription within five days of signing up.


You can also checkout the “ABOUT” section for more background information. It let’s you take a look behind the curtain and explains the reasons behind the madness. And, the “Q&A” might answer some of the questions you have.


Oh, and one more thing. Please …, don’t take the blue pill.